Bridge to High School Data Exchange

Now in its second year, the Bridge to High School Data Exchange – created by schools, for schools – empowers educators with key information they need to better serve rising 9th graders.


PURPOSE

The transition from 8th through 9th grades is a critical time for students. A comprehensive study[1] of DC high school students found that 26% of the variation in their chances of graduating could be explained by 8th grade characteristics, with key predictive factors including SPED, ELL, and overage status; math and reading proficiency levels; absences; and course performance. The study also found that roughly half of first-time 9th graders were “off track” by the end of their freshman year. 

In DC, students and families have many high school options to choose among. However, this context often presents logistical challenges for high schools, with many enrolling students from dozens of different middle schools but lacking key information upfront to serve those incoming 9th graders well. 

 To address this challenge, in 2016, Raise DC’s 9th Grade Counts Network (9GCN), with support from the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), launched a data-sharing initiative among DC middle and high schools to transfer important student information for rising 9th graders. The Bridge to High School Data Exchange is a standardized process for ensuring that essential information is transmitted quickly, automatically, and consistently for students as they move from middle to high school.
 

SCALING A SUCCESSFUL PILOT

In its pilot year, nearly half of eligible DC middle and high school campuses participated, enrolling more than 2,000 first-time 9th graders (more than 700 of whom enrolled across LEAs).

In 2017, 94% of eligible middle and high school campuses are participating from the following LEAs:

  • Kingsman Academy PCS
  • KIPP DC
  • Maya Angelou PCS Evans High School
  • Meridian PCS
  • National Collegiate Preparatory PCS
  • Paul PCS
  • Perry Street Preparatory PCS
  • Somerset Preparatory Academy PCS
  • Thurgood Marshall Academy PCS
  • Two Rivers PCS
  • Washington Global PCS
  • Washington Latin PCS – Middle and Upper Schools
  • Washington Leadership Academy PCS
  • Washington Mathematics Science Technology PCHS

  • Achievement Preparatory Academy PCS
  • Capital City PCS
  • Center City
  • Cesar Chavez PCS for Public Policy
  • City Arts and Prep
  • DC International PCS
  • DC Prep PCS
  • DC Public Schools
  • E.L. Haynes PCS
  • Excel Academy PCS
  • Friendship PCS
  • Hope Community PCS at Tolson
  • Howard University Middle School of Mathematics PCS
  • IDEA PCS
  • Inspired Teaching Demonstration PCS


WHAT IS THE BENEFIT OF PARTICIPATING IN THE DATA EXCHANGE?

For middle schools, participation can increase the chances of exiting 8th graders starting off high school on the right foot by 1) providing high schools with key data that can promote early interventions and 2) establishing relationships with staff at receiving high schools. Middle school will also receive back from participating high schools key first-year outcomes data for exiting 8th graders to assist with program improvement.   

For high schools, participation can enable staff to receive faster access to critical information to help plan course placement, resource allocation, and other necessary supports to successfully transition incoming 9th graders.
 

HOW DOES THE DATA EXCHANGE WORK?

PARTICIPATING HIGH SCHOOLS:

  • June 9, 2017: Schools are able to access via Qlik an initial list of all incoming first-time 9th graders who are enrolling in their school, with the following OSSE-provided student-level data:
    • Attendance* (Only for students enrolling from participating middle schools)
    • Demographic information
    • SPED (Primary disability and level) status
    • ELL status
    • Currently available PARCC scores
    • Free and Reduced Lunch status
    • “At-risk” status (Per UPSFF definition)
  • July 21, 2017: Schools receive an updated enrollment list with the aforementioned OSSE-provided data, plus additional data for students enrolling from participating middle schools (See adjacent column)
  • Aug. 11, 2017: Qlik updated to reflect current enrollment along with aforementioned individual student data
  • Nov. 3, 2017: Feedback surveys due
  • Dec. 15, 2017: Schools receive "loopback" data templates for mid-year grades
  • Feb. 16, 2018: Schools submit via a secured site mid-year math and English grades for all first-time 9th graders, to be distributed back to relevant participating middle schools
  • June 1, 2018: Schools receive "loopback" data templates for final math and English grades and total credits accrued
  • July 20, 2018: Schools submit via a secured site final math and English grades and total credits accrued for all first-time 9th graders, to be distributed back to relevant participating middle schools

PARTICIPATING MIDDLE SCHOOLS:

  • June 2, 2017: Schools receive an email directing them to a secured site, which will contain a data submission template for all exiting 8th graders
  • July 14, 2017: Schools submit via a secured site the following data for all exiting 8th graders:
    • Final 8th grade math and English grades and specific course names (Required)
    • Final 8th grade interim assessment data (MAP, ANet, or i-Ready) (Required)
    • School point of contact information (Required)
    • Anecdotal information regarding students’ strengths (Optional)
  • Nov. 3, 2017: Feedback surveys due
  • Oct. 31, 2017: Schools receive a list of high schools where their exited 8th graders enrolled
  • March 1, 2018: Schools receive mid-year 9th grade math and English course grades for exited 8th graders attending a participating high school
  • July 31, 2018: Schools receive the following outcomes data for exited 8th graders attending a participating high school:
    • Final 9th grade math and English grades
    • Total number of first-year credits accrued
    • Promotion status

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: All student data will be exchanged directly among participating LEAs via Qlik, with data feeding from – but not into – OSSE’s Statewide Longitudinal Education Data system (SLED). While Raise DC provides project management support, it will not have access to student-level data.
 

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER STUDENT DATA IS EXCHANGED?

In October, participating schools are expected to complete a brief survey to determine how participation enabled schools to better meet the needs of rising 9th graders and to provide critical insights for future process improvements. Additionally, OSSE may analyze data points to evaluate the impact of the Bridge to High School Data Exchange and to support 9GCN and participating LEA efforts to improve student outcomes.
 

ARE THERE OTHER OPPORTUNITIES TO CONNECT WITH AND LEARN FROM OTHER PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS?

Yes! Raise DC’s 9th Grade Counts Network (9GCN) meets bimonthly. This coalition of secondary schools, nonprofits, and District agencies launched the Bridge to High School Data Exchange and works together to implement and scale practices for using this data to drive improved student outcomes.
 

WHAT IF I HAVE QUESTIONS OR CONCERNS?

For questions related to Qlik, contact Melissa McKnight, OSSE Director of College and Career Readiness, at (202) 841-3173 or melissa.mcknight@dc.gov. For any other questions related to the Bridge to High School Data Exchange or 9GCN, contact Celine Fejeran, Raise DC Deputy Director, at (202) 303-2438 or cfejeran@raisedc.org.

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[1] September 2014, Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education, District of Columbia: Graduation Pathways Project Summary. http://bit.ly/24ljIoc


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